Travel to Italy Tip #7 | Purchase train tickets in country

Italy’s train system can be frustrating to say the least.  Between delays, cancellations and strikes a traveler can lose their cool.  My next tip won’t necessarily save you money outright, but will help hedge your bets when using the trains for transportation on your trip.

7. When possible, purchase your train tickets once in Italy

My people try to get as much taken care of ahead of time before leaving for their vacation.  While I am an avid planner and believe that setting yourself up early is important, train tickets are where I draw the line.  Except for a few exceptions, I discourage people from buying before leaving.  Here is why:

Traveling brings about the unexpected and Italy more so than many places.  Most of the time these unplanned situations are actually positive, but occasionally they can wreak havoc on a trip.  Italian trains are more often than not late, some cancelled altogether.  Strikes are common.  You can actually find out exactly when and where most of the train strikes are as the publish them each month, but prepurchased train tickets usually need to be taken care of before that final list is public.  Insurance must (should) be added to prepurchased tickets to cover these situations.  Also, you never know when you might fall in love with a place or want to change your plans.  With prepaid tickets you lose your flexibility.

There are times I would take advantage of buying ahead.  For example, if I am ever arriving in Rome but need to take the train the next day to another major city I grab my ticket.  Some of my past clients staying in Florence have wanted to day trip to Venice and for simplicity’s sake I have made pre-arrangements.

Instead, I head straight to the train station or a local travel agency once I arrive in Italy and purchase the tickets I need.  For travel between smaller towns (example:  Orvieto)  I just arrive a few minutes before hand and get my ticket from the window or the machine.  That way if I want to linger a bit longer over a meal or am itching to get back earlier I have the flexibility.

Train travel seems overwhelming but is actually quite simple and I will be running a series on my train travel tips in the upcoming weeks.  Check back this week for more tips about car rental, taxis and public transportation.

I love feedback, so leave me comments!

copyright 2012  Andi Brown, Once in a Lifetime Travel

Free Printable Packing List

Italy-1619899_1920

Subscribe to our monthly travel newsletter and receive our packing list as a thank you.

Comments

comments

About the author: Andi Brown

I am passionate about helping people create vacations that are perfect for them through personalized travel planning, itinerary review and small experience focused tours. My services put an emphasis on the experience of Italy, getting my clients away from the tourist crowds and into the heart and soul of the people. I believe in working with family run businesses at great locations with attention to the details. If you can dream it I can make it happen.

No comment to “Travel to Italy Tip #7 | Purchase train tickets in country”

You can leave a reply or Trackback this post.

  1. Paula - 2012-01-31 at 5:28 pm Reply

    Hey Pandi,
    Does this tip go for travelling in/out/through Italy? In other words, how would you handle travelling through more than one country (with the Eurorail pass)?
    Love your blogs
    You make me long to go back!

    • onceinalifetimetravel - 2012-01-31 at 5:36 pm Reply

      It would depend on when and how much and where you are traveling….I know, can I be more vague? I got a pass for my Germany, France and Italy trip but added up the point to point cost and realised too late it was cheaper NOT getting the Eurorail pass. Part was my fault as I squandered a day by using it for a small connection within France thinking that the punch would include my night train to Italy. Wrong. My train left exactly 7 minutes after midnight and they said new day new punch. No amount of pleading or feet stomping worked. Rick Steves is an excellent source of specific rail info and they are the experts for travel within Europe. I personally just figure out my point to point costs and compare with the cost of the pass. There are combos for the countries (they have to touch each other) and for some individual countries.
      Does that help? And thanks, I’m glad you are loving them!
      Andi

    • onceinalifetimetravel - 2012-02-02 at 7:38 am Reply

      Paula, here is the link to Rick’s train cost worksheet that should help you http://www.ricksteves.com/rail/comparetickets.htm

  2. Debra Kolkka - 2012-01-31 at 6:00 pm Reply

    Good advice. Travel agents charge quite a lot to purchase train tickets in advance. I don’t know who is getting this money but in some cases the cost I’d more than double the price of the ticket.
    I think Eurail passes used to be a good idea decades ago, but I have not heard good reports about them now. I usually go the day before to the nearest station to purchae tickets on the Eurostar. I have always got seats.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.